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Kerio_jwu

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Hello,

Calling all former and current Exchange administrators, consultants and resellers.

We are performing a comparison study on the total cost of ownership of Microsoft Exchange and Kerio MailServer. Not all networks are the same. Some take longer and some are faster.

http://www.surveymonkey.com/s.aspx?sm=c2k0lozE6CaongcjilnmDg _3d_3d

The results will be published on www.exchangealternative.com

[Updated on: Wed, 06 March 2013 18:10] by Moderator

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Kerio_jwu

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Thank you all for your participation. The white paper is now available.

Kerio customers save an average of 72% in just the first year. Download it now.
http://www.kerio.com/img/kms/Exchange_TCO_Comparison.pdf

[Updated on: Wed, 18 March 2009 01:19]

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mbox

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I've run an Exchange 2000 box for about nine years and have seen many people describe newer versions of Exchange as complex and difficult for small organizations with < 100 mailboxes and one IT person to maintain themselves (rather than having someone else host it), and the above study echos that. True, you need Active Directory and a good backup system, but many small organizations may already have these in place for other reasons, and with Kerio they may want to link to Active Directory anyway. Spam/antivirus is an evolving threat, but there are hosted services for this which can be setup just by switching MX records. This leads us then to the Exchange server itself, which can be installed on only one server if you choose. What is it about Exchange 2007/2010, more specifically, that makes things more complicated? Is it the tools? database maintenance? configuration options? dependencies? recoverability when things break? licensing? expertise required? The above study mentions some of this and mainly describes in brief Kerio being more integrated, having a simpler user interface, and being easy to install. Is the contrast really that stark where you might say, "I'll maintain Kerio, yes sir, but no way will you get me to run Exchange!"?

I might say the following about Kerio, but can anyone honestly say something along these lines about Exchange 2007/2010? "I got it running in only a few hours. Though I'm no expert, I have some familiarity with mail server technology in general, and the software was intuitive to install and configure, importing was a cinch, and I only occasionally needed to consult the reference manual for clarity. It runs without my attention, but I do run OS update from time-to-time or reconfigure some mailbox options on request. Once the hardware fried, but I was able to quickly restore from backup to a new server. Performance is great. The software is just swell."
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RMCS

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I just read the post by mbox and thought I would add my "two cents". I have been installing & supporting Exchange since 5.5 and can honestly say that the Exchange infrastructure has gotten increasing more difficult to support in 2007/2010. The ONLY reason I even found out about Kerio was because I was looking for another email alternative to recommend to clients. Here's why:

Performance: While it's true that Exchange performance has been increased in 2007 and then again in 2010, I find that it still requires waaaaay more horsepower than you would think. Or perhaps I should say it gobbles up more resources than you might like! I have a client with 20 mailboxes running on a server dedicated to Exchange 2010 with Xeon Quad-core processors & 8GB of RAM. Over half the RAM is being used just by store.exe! In contrast, I have Kerio Connect running on a VM with 1GB of memory, supporting 20 mailboxes and only using 300K. In general, larger enterprises have the money for dedicated mail servers, small businesses do not. ADVANTAGE - Kerio

Database Maintenance: This really is a "no-comparison" in my opinion. Exchange uses a database while Kerio uses flat-file. Exchange might scale better for large enterprise, but a 5-25 mailbox postoffice will perform just fine using flat-files. Who hasn't had problems with Exchange stores that wouldn't mount properly or were corrupted. If you're not intimately familiar with ISINTEG & ESEUTIL, you're NOT a true Exchange Admin! I love the fact that you can drill down to the individual .eml file for any user. Backup is soooo much easier (but more on that below). ADVANTAGE - Kerio

Installation: I challenge ANYONE to configure Exchange 2007/2010 faster than Kerio Connect. Installation of Kerio was so fast I thought there was something wrong! ADVANTAGE - Kerio

Configuration: To me, this is the biggest selling point of Kerio Connect. With Exchange 2007/2010, Microsoft can't decide if they want to be Apple or Linux. One one side, they give you a GUI to perform SOME tasks, but many of the tasks can't be performed without resorting to the Management Shell (aka - the command line). If I thought the command line was the best way to perform maintenance, I would have moved to Linux a long time ago! I know, I know, the Exchange Management Shell is sooooo powerful that you can do soooo many more things than with the GUI. But how many small businesses need those functions? They want an easy way to add users, maintain aliases, manage spam, create distribution groups, archive & backup.

Just as an example: A user leaves a company and the owner wants the old mailbox deleted and the contents moved to another user.

The Exchange way: Export-Mailbox -Identity <MailboxIdParameter> -PSTFolderPath <Path_Of_PST_Folder>\<File_Name>.pst (yada yada blah blah). Then import the email with another command: Import-Mailbox -Identity <MailboxIdParameter> -PSTFolderPath <Path_Of_PST_Folder>\<File_Name>.pst. Oh yeah! Don't forget that you might have to give YOURSELF permission to do this using the Add-MailboxPermission command!

The Kerio way: Using the GUI, right-click on the name of the user to be removed, click on "remove". A window will appear asking if you would like to move the user's message folder to another users account. Select the account and click OK. Done! Wow, that was easy!

When I was migrating users from Exchange 2003 to Exchange 2010, I could start the process from the GUI. I could watch the status of the migration using the GUI, but if a specific mailbox failed, I had to go to the command line to "clear" the failed job. Couldn't do it from the GUI. Over and over again I find that it is increasing difficult to "configure" Exchange 2007/2010. ADVANTAGE - Kerio (by a landslide).

Backup: Open Kerio Connect, click on Archiving & Backup and click on the "Enable backup" checkbox. By default, Kerio will perform a Full backup on Sunday with Differential backups on all other days. Click on "Advanced" for more options. All backups are zipped files which contain all relevant data for a full restore on another server. You can even open the zipped backup and drill down to the individual message and open it with Outlook Express. In order to perform a full restore of the server, you DO have to go to the command line. Oh well, I guess you can't have everything! Exchange backups are obviously more complicated. Ever tried to backup a 10GB Exchange database to an offsite location? On a daily or weekly basis? How did that go for you? ADVANTAGE - Kerio

Licensing: Exchange requires you to purchase the server software PLUS a CAL for each user/device accessing the server. Want support? Sorry, not included. Want upgrade protection? Sure, you can purchase Software Assurance for a boat-load more (FYI - You may never get to use that "assurance" as there is no telling when Microsoft is going to come out with the next version). Kerio is very simple: purchase a license for each mailbox needed. Support and upgrade protection included for first year. ADVANTAGE - Kerio

Expertise Required: Is Kerio perfect, NO. But the skills necessary to keep a server running & maintained are minimal. Your average mid-level tech will have no problem. Maintaining Exchange requires more high-level expertise. Sure, if nothing goes wrong, Exchange is great! But so is Kerio! I'm not sure if Kerio Connect will ever be "everything" that Exchange is, but so far it's feature set is everything a small business client needs.

[Updated on: Tue, 09 November 2010 00:33]

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benodilo

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I'm really surprised by the increased cost of maintenance every year :
2009 : +13 %
2010 : +20 % !!!

I'm not sure the Microsoft Exchange server is more expensive with education licencing

[Updated on: Tue, 23 November 2010 17:27]

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Wilmott-IT

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Quote:
Expertise Required: Is Kerio perfect, NO. But the skills necessary to keep a server running & maintained are minimal. Your average mid-level tech will have no problem. Maintaining Exchange requires more high-level expertise. Sure, if nothing goes wrong, Exchange is great! But so is Kerio! I'm not sure if Kerio Connect will ever be "everything" that Exchange is, but so far it's feature set is everything a small business client needs.

This is the single biggest reason we use this. That and the fact we dont need to integrate with AD for small deployments.

Wilmott-IT Services, Business IT Systems Management, Central Coast NSW Australia. Visit Wilmott-IT Services
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gbrown100

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When selling Kerio I do have a couple of problems:

1. I have clients who have several companies with staff that want to keep their emails completely separate and send / receive individually from them. For Kerio this is more costly than Exchange as it is based on a per mailbox basis.

2. For companies where they have to have a windows server for other reasons there really is not much difference in price to MS SBS Server once you take into account the fact the disks need to be pretty rapid in Kerio (rules out SATA really).

How do others counter this argument?

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benjalamelami

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I have SATA disks... 100 users, 40 of them with Outlook KOFF... 10 iPhones... 10 Chatberries... so far... 50 users or so with IMAP/POP3... so far... It doesnt even come close to sweating on a virtualized server with a RAID 1... frankly, the software is just good. Performance is very good. My only complains are the KOFF is somewhat buggy and so is the ChatBerry connector for the server. For all other purposes... its been such a good piece of software.
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scottwilkins

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gbrown100 wrote on Fri, 04 February 2011 10:10
When selling Kerio I do have a couple of problems:

1. I have clients who have several companies with staff that want to keep their emails completely separate and send / receive individually from them. For Kerio this is more costly than Exchange as it is based on a per mailbox basis.


This is doable with aliases and Outlook rules. Still only one mailbox per user. You can enter as many alternate addresses in one Kerio account as you want. Then use either Kerio server rules or Outlook rules to dump incoming messages to an appropriate folder. Then train the user how to "send from" a different email address. Easy.

gbrown100 wrote on Fri, 04 February 2011 10:10

2. For companies where they have to have a windows server for other reasons there really is not much difference in price to MS SBS Server once you take into account the fact the disks need to be pretty rapid in Kerio (rules out SATA really).

How do others counter this argument?


Exchange also requires SAS speed in hard drives to be just as good. Kerio works fine on SATA, but as with anything more speed the better! SAS makes Kerio feel down right silly fast. I bet you wouldn't find any mail server that wouldn't have the same result. P.S. I'm currently building a set using only 7200RPM SAS drives in my mail server for about 70 users. They were a little more than SATA but much cheaper than the 10K or 15K RPM models, and faster than SATA too.

[Updated on: Fri, 03 June 2011 19:43]

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mr.mars

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Quote:
Licensing: Exchange requires you to purchase the server software PLUS a CAL for each user/device accessing the server. Want support? Sorry, not included. Want upgrade protection? Sure, you can purchase Software Assurance for a boat-load more (FYI - You may never get to use that "assurance" as there is no telling when Microsoft is going to come out with the next version). Kerio is very simple: purchase a license for each mailbox needed. Support and upgrade protection included for first year. ADVANTAGE - Kerio

I think that you still need cal licence when you run Kerio on windows machine isnt it?
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scottwilkins

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mr.mars wrote on Tue, 12 July 2011 12:48

I think that you still need cal licence when you run Kerio on windows machine isnt it?


Basically no, no CAL needed. You can run Kerio on an old XP Pro based machine and it will run just fine. Or even Server 2008 if you wanted, with no extra CALs. The "users" in Kerio do not tranlate to "users" in Windows, unless you use Active Directory Integration, then you'd need a CAL. But you'd already have that CAL for the AD domain, and wouldn't need an extra CAL for Exchange. Isn't MS licensing a mess? Wink

[Updated on: Tue, 12 July 2011 14:59]

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reinhold

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scottwilkins wrote on Tue, 12 July 2011 14:58

Basically no, no CAL needed. You can run Kerio on an old XP Pro based machine and it will run just fine. Or even Server 2008 if you wanted, with no extra CALs. The "users" in Kerio do not tranlate to "users" in Windows, unless you use Active Directory Integration, then you'd need a CAL. But you'd already have that CAL for the AD domain, and wouldn't need an extra CAL for Exchange. Isn't MS licensing a mess? Wink


I second that, MS has confirmed to me that in an hosted environment we can provide Kerio on Windows Servers, only on the license (SPLA) for the server os.
And of course the Kerio license, but that is of no interest for MS Wink
Regards
/Brian

Brian Reinhold Jensen
Solutio ApS
Certified Business Partner
http://http://www.solutio.dk/loesninger/kerio-software/
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hbianchi

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I suggest this comparison should be updated to reflect 2012 pricing.
benodilo

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Agree. This price of licences increase every year with more 10/20 % !!!
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